Glamour US June 2017
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Glamour US June 2017

Rose is featured in Glamour US’ June issue, taking part in a series in which four actresses bared their current emotion : Rose chose « calm ». You can check her portrait in the gallery and read her short interview below :

« For the last couple of months, I’ve been filming in New York City. It’s easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle and adrenaline here, especially after some very emotional days with a big team of people. I have to take a hot shower at the end of the day just to relax and feel subdued. Some people may perceive calmness as weakness, when it absolutely is not that at all. You have to choose to be calm in this chaotic world – without getting walked all over – and that requires you to have a backbone. »

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Magazines Scans > April 2017 | Glamour US [+ 1]
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Rose Leslie out of her comfort zone
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Rose Leslie out of her comfort zone

Rose has been very busy while filming The Good Fight as a new photoshoot taken while she was living in Brooklyn has been released today by Monrowe Magazine along with an interview. Be sure to read it below and check the gorgeous pictures taken by Krisztian Eder in the gallery :

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Photoshoots > 2017 | Monrowe [+ 10]

MONROWE As Gwen Dawson—the youngest house maid at “Downton Abbey”—she secretly dreamed of escaping a life of service, and becoming a secretary (in the show’s very first season). In a memorable season six cameo, she returned to visit England’s best known stately home, as the wife of a rising politician, an eloquent feminist, and an ardent advocate for the education of women. In “Game of Thrones” she was the raven-haired wilding archer Ygritte, for whom Jon Snow broke his Night’s Watch vow of chastity—kindling an impossible passion that both characters would deny, even to themselves, until she died in his arms (toward the end of Season 4), while the wilding armies lay siege to the Wall and Castle Black, telling Snow one last time (with a broad Lancashire accent) that he “know[s] nothing.”

As for the fate and fortunes of Rose Leslie’s latest character, Maia Rindell—a recent law school graduate (from a prominent and enormously wealthy Chicago family, who’s secured a job offer at the law firm of her godmother, Diane Lockhart)—this may depend less on Leslie— or her versatile gifts as an actress, or even on the storytelling skills of Robert and Michelle King in creating an absorbing sequel to their long-running CBS hit series “The Good Wife,” and rather more on the venerable broadcast channel’s marketing bet that it can launch its new subscription streaming service “All Access” by luring the old show’s loyal audience (of 10-13 million regular viewers over seven seasons) back to the colorful political and legal world of Alicia Florrick (played by Julianna Margulies, who won three Emmys and was nominated for seven more in the role), but without Margulies’ beloved character ever actually turning up in the sequel.

MONROWE recently caught up with Rose Leslie by phone, shortly after her return home to London following some five months living and shooting the first season of “The Good Fight” in Brooklyn, New York.

Guy Lesser: So, is Julianna Margulies going to be lured into appearing in Season 2 of “The Good Fight” when you all come back to shoot next fall?
Rose Leslie: I don’t believe so. I don’t believe so. No—but, as a mere actor, that’s not something I would ever be privy to. Were you wanting to see Juliana appear?

Not necessarily. But when a character like Alicia doesn’t die, with, say—
An arrow through the heart?

There’s no closure to her storyline, and of course Alicia does periodically receive mention in “The Good Fight.”
True, true. But I loved the way they ended “The Good Wife” and left the door open— even if there isn’t any way that that she’s going to come through it. But it also reflects life, when, you know, you’re not too sure whether you are going to see an old friend again.

Continue reading Rose Leslie out of her comfort zone

Actress Rose Leslie showcases Spring’s deconstructed trend and talks strong female roles
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Actress Rose Leslie showcases Spring’s deconstructed trend and talks strong female roles

New day, new photoshoot ! This time it is online clothing store Farfetch which has released a new interview of Rose along with beautiful pictures taken by photographer Tom Craig.

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Photoshoots > 2017 | Farfetch [+ 9]

FARFETCH — You could forgive Rose Leslie for finding it rather trying to have the same 5 words incessantly yelled at her in the street – even if those 5 words are ‘You know nothing, Jon Snow’ and came as a result of her stellar 3-year stint on Game of Thrones. But it turns out that Rose is so very nice as to insist she actually likes it. ‘It’s a lovely thing to be on the receiving end of,’ she says. ‘I feel so lucky, a, to have [a catchphrase] and, b, to be a part of a show that is universally adored.’ It’s a sunny spring day, but the east London warehouse we’re shooting in is so inexplicably cold that even a person who grew up in a Scottish castle (that would be Rose) is gripped by the chill. Still, she poses gamely around the freezing space to show off SS17’s key deconstructed pieces to their best advantage.

From the big fashion hitters to the titans of television, Rose’s ascent to stardom has come via some of the modern era’s most celebrated shows: her breakout role Gwen in the first season of Downton Abbey, then Thrones’ Ygritte, Wildling warrior and doomed love of Jon Snow. Now her flawless record continues with The Good Fight, the much-anticipated The Good Wife spin-off and a newly minted hit. The series follows Christine Baranski’s Diane Lockhart as she moves to a new law firm after her plans to retire fall through (she loses all her money in a Ponzi scheme run by a close friend); Rose plays Maia, Diane’s beloved goddaughter and offspring of the Ponzi schemer. Here, she shares style advice, reminisces about Ygritte’s costumes and tells us about Maia’s ‘pretty good fight of her own’.

Everyone seems to have gone wild for The Good Fight. Do you think that’s down in part to how very current it feels, exploring subjects like fake news and even opening the pilot with Diane Lockhart watching the Trump inauguration?

Rose Leslie: ‘Yes, and I’m certainly incredibly proud of the fact that [showrunners] Robert and Michelle King decided to be bold enough to take on the administration in terms of highlighting what they feel needs to be brought to people’s attention. In the pilot, I think that with nothing being said, you can project whatever your own feelings are to Donald Trump being sworn in. Diane Lockhart’s face is so beautifully blank – you were able to project whatever your own thoughts were onto her face and be like, “Oh my god, this must be what Diane is feeling.” I thought that was very clever.’

Continue reading Actress Rose Leslie showcases Spring’s deconstructed trend and talks strong female roles

Rose Leslie Reinvents the Role
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Rose Leslie Reinvents the Role

Magazine WWD has published a new interview and beautiful photoshoot of Rose who talks about The Good Fight – the show had its season finale yesterday and will be back for season 2 next year !

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Photoshoot > 2017 | WWD [+ 3]

WWD — Rose Leslie is branching out – and that’s not just because she’s just tried octopus for the first time. The 30-year-old Leslie is finally sitting down to a late lunch at Zuma in Midtown Manhattan, about to depart New York as her new show, “The Good Fight,” wraps shooting season one. It was the Scottish actress’ first time filming in the city and her verdict on it — and the octopus — is positive. Leslie, until now best known as Ygritte on “Game of Thrones” — she, of “You know nothing, Jon Snow” fame — has left the furs and battle scenes behind and is trying on corporate law for size, in “The Good Wife” spinoff “The Good Fight,” the season finale of which aired Sunday night.

It was brilliant to be able to go off in a whole new universe, even though [the characters] are familiar,” Leslie says. “There are similarities with the previous show, but you’re exploring completely different avenues and characters and seeing this woman whom you’ve loved for so long, Christine Baranski’s Diane Lockhart, falling off her pedestal. We’re really seeing her in a kind of free-fall, and that was something that really pulled me to the project — because she’s always been such an inspirational character to watch for women.

The spinoff, which has already been renewed for a second season, follows Lockhart as she seeks to start a new life after financial ruin at the hands of her close friends. Leslie is Maya, the only child of the friends, whose lies unravel in a Madoff-like manner. Much like “The Good Wife,” writers Robert and Michelle King focus the story lines of “The Good Fight” heavily on current politics and social issues.

There’s something incredibly bold and brave about it, and I highly respect the Kings for putting these issues at the forefront of the writing and the episodes,” Leslie says. “We approached the issue of police brutality, and then also of fake news, and just hopefully, as a result, a trickle-down effect. I’m really assuming this is why the Kings pursue this — to help the viewers, or to enable a kind of thought process that’s like, ‘You’re right!’ Once you’re reflecting society into our show, hopefully that will then project onto the audience, who’ll be like, ‘Wait a minute, your show’s based on reality.’

“The Good Wife,” which ended in May 2016, carried a strongly loyal fan base, much like Leslie’s previous shows “Game of Thrones” and “Downton Abbey.” “God, I’ve been so fortunate, actually,” she says. “Because [‘Thrones’ and ‘Downton’] were hits and so universally loved that I’ve only ever been on the receiving end of pure joy, when people are expressing the pleasure they derive from something like ‘Thrones’ or ‘Downton Abbey.’ You’re so energized by the story lines and by the worlds that you know that it’s real escapism for some of the fans. And, that’s an incredible, extraordinary feeling — to know you’re a part of something that gives people joy.” (source)

DuJour Magazine Spring 2017 Issue Scans
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DuJour Magazine Spring 2017 Issue Scans

A new interview and pictures of Rose for DuJour Magazine have been released a while ago on their website but we know have the scans of the written article and it comes with new lovely photos from the shoot ! Be sure to check them and read a new interview of Rose in the gallery here :

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Magazines Scans > Spring 2017 | DuJour Magazine [+2]

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‘The Last Magazine’ Interview & Photoshoot
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‘The Last Magazine’ Interview & Photoshoot

Rose has been recently interviewed for ‘The Last Magazine’ and some new gorgeous pictures of her have been taken, be sure to check them all in the gallery and read the interview below :

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Photoshoots > 2017 | The Last Magazine [+ 8]

THE LAST MAGAZINE In the new CBS All Access show The Good Fight, viewers are introduced to Maia Rindell, a young woman who has just passed the bar exam and lands a job at a prestigious law firm. It’s new, exciting, and a little daunting for Maia, and that’s before her life is swiftly upended by a family scandal. Stepping into the role is Rose Leslie, who herself is exploring uncharted territory, albeit without the chaos Maia endures. Residing in America for the first time while taking on a lead role in a celebrated franchise has given her something to channel into the character, but it’s also given her the momentum to break out as a new star.

Though Leslie is originally from Scotland, she spent enough of her life away to replace her accent with an English one. “I lived in France for about three years from ten to thirteen, so I kind of lost any Scottish accent when I was living there—I had some weird hybrid of a French-English accent,” she says. “Then I went back to Southern England and it was over, I went into the English accent.

Raised with four siblings, Leslie’s proclivity towards acting may have simply been an effect of being the middle child. “There’s no other member of my family who is in the creative industry, so to speak,” she says. “I’m in the middle, the only ginger, older brother and sister and younger brother and sister. I think I got the bug from not being listened to. I think the middle child syndrome stepped in relatively early and I think I realized I needed to branch out. My [older] brother is intelligent and my sister is very sporty and intelligent, and I must have subliminally gone, Shit, you’re that, you’re that, I want to be something different.

It didn’t take much for Leslie to pursue the acting path. “It wasn’t like an epiphany that made somebody stand still and go, This is what I need to do,” she explains. “It just felt brilliant, it felt natural, and I wanted to carry on following this particular path of getting up in front of people and performing.” She enrolled in drama school, but even there it was always about performing. “Some of it was theory obviously and some of it was practical, and I just remember only loving the practicality of it, and not really wanting to theorize on a long essay the reasons as to why I wanted to, so then it felt rather innate.”

Drama school helped get her representation, and before long she was getting auditions and small roles. She won a Scottish BAFTA for a television film called New Town, but her most widespread breakthrough came on Downton Abbey, after their costume director happened to see her in a play. As the ambitious housemaid Gwen Dawson, Leslie was part of the main cast of the show during season one. “It was the first television role I had where I knew I was going to be employed for six months,” she recalls. “I was always in bit parts before, but now suddenly it was a six-month gig that was just incredible to me.” Her character ended up representing a major theme in the show, the rise of the working class, and she even made an appearance in the final season as a refined woman unrecognizable to the estate. But Leslie remembers it more for the fond memories it gave her in her early twenties: “I was living in London with girlfriends, and the idea of getting into a car to drive off into the countryside to shoot for a day and have that happen five days a week was awesome.

Continue reading ‘The Last Magazine’ Interview & Photoshoot

The Ruling on Rose Leslie
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The Ruling on Rose Leslie

DuJour Magazine has released a new interview of Rose as well as a gorgeous photoshoot, be sure to check it below !

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Photoshoots > 2017 | DuJour Magazine [+8]

DUJOUR – In the opening scene of The Good Fight, the world of its acclaimed predecessor The Good Wife is transformed into a post-Trump world. The familiar face of Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski), network television’s favorite liberal boss lady, fills the frame, and pans out to her flipping off her television before the 45th president is sworn in. She’s got better things to do than watch the inauguration. She must draw up her plans for the next chapter: namely, retirement in the South of France.

While Lockhart may be plotting her escape from America, Rose Leslie—who plays one of The Good Fight’s headlining new characters, Maia Rindell—just got here, and she has been thoroughly enjoying herself. The 30-year-old Scottish actress arrived in Brooklyn before the election to begin filming her first series on this side of the pond, and now, ahead of The Good Fight’s premiere, we’re meeting at a trendy little breakfast spot in Williamsburg. When I spot Leslie being escorted to my table, she’s chatting with the server like they’re old friends. “My mum and my sister are here, and I brought them here literally two days ago,” she explains. “Oh my god, I love it. It’s so good.

As she eats an omelette and we compare Williamsburg to Camden Town, Leslie is all smiles. She seems ridiculously normal. Nothing about her public persona had led me to believe she wouldn’t be, but like the vast majority of fans, I’d first encountered Leslie in a completely alternate reality: north of the Wall on Game of Thrones. Seeing her as Maia Rindell on The Good Fight was almost more jolting than meeting her in person. As a newly-minted lawyer starting her first job, Maia’s fresh face and wardrobe of suits is quite a contrast with Ygritte’s fur hood and furrowed brow.

Maia’s an intelligent girl,” Leslie says. “She’s not self-entitled despite being an only child of billionaires. And it was nice that she wasn’t covered in dirt or covered in fur.” She laughs.

Those billionaires she mentioned are good friends of Diane Lockhart, which is how Maia lands an associate position at Lockhart, Deckler, Gussman, Lee, Lyman, Gilbert, Lurie, Kagan, Tannenbaum and Associates (try saying that three times fast) one year after the series finale of The Good Wife, which ended in May. Like its predecessor, The Good Fight will feature episodic drama taking place in the courtroom as well as longer, scandalous plot lines inspired by real world events. Last time, Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) was at the center of the storm as she dealt with her politician husband’s Eliot Spitzer-inspired indiscretions.

This time, it’s Maia who is unwillingly thrust into the spotlight when her father, Henry Rindell, is arrested for his alleged involvement in a Madoff-style Ponzi scheme. The kicker? Diane Lockhart is one of the victims, so her plan to fly off into the sunset now faces a nebulous hiatus. But by the end of episode one, it’s clear that Diane is one of few people not blaming Maia. They’re both on the outs at the old firm—Diane is getting heat from many of the clients she recommended to the Rindell’s investment fund—and they both manage to find positions at another firm, Reddick, Boseman, & Kolstad.

The new firm is a mostly African American one, which likely means the stage is set for the show to tackle more of the racial issues prevalent in the news—police brutality was already at the center of episode one’s case. And another issue The Good Fight will definitely be ripping from the headlines, Leslie divulges, is fake news. “We are just kind of like highlighting the fact that fake news is real, fake news is here, it is gaining momentum, and what world are we living in whereby truth is no longer relevant?” she says. “You realize that fake news is personally affecting [Maia] on social media, jeopardizing her career, and how phenomenally scary that is.

I ask Leslie if the show’s focus on issues was part of the attraction for her. “When I watched The Good Wife,” she says, “I remember realizing as an audience member that it was thought-provoking and intriguing, and that it stimulated conversations in a brilliant way.” She says the show was hugely popular among her friends in London. “In an effortless way, it holds up that mirror to society.

As Maia navigates her way through a scandal that hits close to home, and the rest of us navigate our way through today’s barrage of ever more scandalous news, Leslie says she’s looking forward to detaching from her character, and really getting away from it all. When shooting wraps, she’ll head back to London, where her next role will be planning an epic vacation. “I’ve never been to Asia so I’d like to travel there. And really travel—stay in hostels and do the exploring thing through the eyes of a backpacker. I’ve never done that before, which is why it’s my full-on intention to do it properly.” (source)